SUNY Student Assembly Passes $5K Resolution, Depite Opposition from Governor Cuomo

Reynaldo Muniz III at SUNY Assembly

Reynaldo Muniz III at SUNY Student Assembly

Despite the reported opposition from New York’s Governor Andrew Cuomo, the resolution supporting a $5,000 minimum starting salary per course for adjuncts was debated and passed April 4 by the statewide SUNY Student Assembly, which represents some 463,000 students.

The following report is by James DeArce, an adjunct at SUNY New Paltz, who is both a nursing student and Student Trustee Member of the Board of Trustees at SUNY Ulster County Community College: MORE

New State Budget Increases Aid for SUNY, Helps Safeguard SUNY Hospitals

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UUP President Fred Kowal

 

The head of the union that represents academic and professional faculty at the State University of New York today expressed concern that while the enacted state budget took many steps forward, it fell short of providing the resources necessary to meet the university’s growing needs.

“State lawmakers responded to our call to increase state support for SUNY’s state-operated campuses and to safeguard SUNY hospitals, and for that we are extremely grateful,” said UUP President Fred Kowal, Ph.D. He noted that the $7.6 million increase for state-operated campuses is the first increase in state support for SUNY since 2008. “It’s a step in the right direction toward closing the gap created by years of underfunding, but more needs to be done.” MORE

 

PBS NewsHour: Adjuncts in Higher Ed.

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PBS NewsHour story, broadcast nationally on February 6, focuses on the plight of low-paid adjuncts. Includes interview with New Paltz Chapter President Peter D.G. Brown, Watch now: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/videos/#62335

Congress Takes Note

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WASHINGTON — It’s time for Congress to pay attention to the abuse of adjunct faculty members, and the way their poor working conditions impact not only them, but their students, says a new report from the House Education and the Workforce Committee. While the report largely endorses previous studies on the subject, “The Just-In-Time Professor” document marks the first time Congress has so formally acknowledged a situation that adjunct activists have long deemed exploitative.

“The contingent faculty trend appears to mirror trends in the general labor market toward a flexible, ‘just-in-time’ workforce, with lower compensation and unpredictable schedules for what were once considered middle-class jobs,” says the report from the office of Rep. George Miller, the senior committee Democrat, from California. “The trend should be of concern to policymakers both because of what it means for the living standards and the work lives of those individuals we expect to educate the next generation of scientists, entrepreneurs, and other highly skilled workers, and what it may mean for the quality of higher education itself.”